Press/Gallery: Emilia Clarke on Life After Khaleesi—Including a Historic Clinique Contract

Thursday, Jan 16, 2020

After plotting world domination for eight seasons on Game of Thrones, Clarke reflects on her own quieter sense of ambition, rooted in the “sustainable and real,” she says. Meanwhile, a new role as Clinique’s ambassador, announced today, puts her back on the global stage.

VANITY FAIR – Call it auspicious, to sit down with a former queen on the eve of a nail-biting election. It was a clear December morning in London, a day before Britons cast their fate (and Brexit’s) with Boris Johnson, and the Protector of the Realm—to use one of Emilia Clarke’s many titles on Game of Thrones—was assessing the political landscape. “Is it a full moon?” the actor said, interest piqued. (An Instagram astrologer had told me so.) “Maybe that will kick the . . . —no,” she interrupted herself with a weary laugh. “It will just soften the patriarchy ever so lightly.”

Clarke, whose now-departed character was known to scorch entire neighborhoods with one dragonic exhale, leads with a comparatively light hand. In a November post about the UK’s voter-registration deadline, she delivered a message (“You have a voice. Use it!”) with a silent procession of cue cards. Last March, when she first revealed her tumultuous medical history—a pair of brain aneurysms in the show’s early days—she did so with a lyrical, unsparing essay on the New Yorker’s website. She isn’t much for peddling influence; instead, she reps sweatshirts for Same You, the charity she founded to support neurorehabilitation for young patients. After the GOT series finale and its torrent of press, she has kept things earnest and under-the-radar—however much someone with 26 million followers can slip into incognito mode.

That makes Clarke’s latest role—the first global ambassador for the beauty company Clinique—at once a like-minded alliance and a return to the spotlight. “You’ve got your spidey senses,” explained the actor, sitting on a gray velvet sofa (a softer iron throne) at the Edition hotel. “My gut was like, ‘You’re going to enjoy this!’ ” At a time when authentic is a buzzword on every brand’s bingo card, she manages a kind of translucent candor. (The way Clarke described the brand’s longstanding image—“completely universal, totally relatable, totally modern”—sounds like the elevator pitch for tapping the 33-year-old as a spokesperson.) A sunbeam slipped across the room, igniting her lagoon-colored eyes. I found myself lilting precipitously off the sofa, like a wayward houseplant, to avoid casting a shadow.

Clinique, founded a half-century ago as a prescient, dermatologist-backed skin-care line, didn’t set out to sell miracles. The 1967 Vogue article that helped spark the company—titled “Can Great Skin Be Created?”—laid out a practical, yes-it-can mission. Back then (and for generations of beauty inductees since), demystification arrived by way of a streamlined three-step system: cleansing bar, exfoliating toner, familiar yellow moisturizer. In lieu of the smiling perfection of beauty ads, Irving Penn photographed heroic still lifes, making saints of ho-hum bathroom essentials.

Now, in an age of algorithm-generated everything, customization is the operative word. Clinique iD, which launched last year, riffs on that original moisturizer by targeting a cross-section of skin needs: four hydrating bases, five potent mix-ins, 20 different permutations. “You have options because we all change all the time,” said Clarke, who—to echo that classic Hair Club for Men slogan—is not only the face, she’s also a client. “I used the products, and my skin got better! I’m like, ‘Yes! I don’t need to lie!’ ” she added with a laugh. “It’s all true.”

Continue reading Press/Gallery: Emilia Clarke on Life After Khaleesi—Including a Historic Clinique Contract

Gallery: Addition to The Guardian/Observer Photoshoot

Saturday, Dec 21, 2019

Here is a lovely outtake from The Observer.

 

Press: Emilia Clarke To Make West End Debut In THE SEAGULL

Friday, Dec 20, 2019

 

BROADWAY WORLD – Game of Thrones star, Emilia Clarke, will make her West End debut in Chekhov’s The Seagull at The Playhouse Theater.

According to a new report, Clarke will portray Nina in the new adaptation from Anya Reiss, which will be helmed by director Jamie Lloyd.

The Seagull will begin performances March 11, 2020 and play a limited run through May 30. Booking begins tomorrow. Tickets are available at https://t.co/8FH9dYk0ys?amp=1.

The Seagull premiered in 1896 and has since come to be regarded as the first major work of playwright Anton Chekhov.

Telling the story of the fallout from aging actress Irina’s decision to bring famous writer Trigorin home to her brother’s country estate, the play is a moving testament to writers, actors, and those who know them.

Clarke is best known for her eight years playing Daenerys Targaryen, the Mother of Dragons, on HBO’s “Game of Thrones.” She made her Broadway debut portraying Holly Golightly in Breakfast At Tiffany’s in 2013.

Press: Emilia reveals her torment over her second brain aneurysm and her fear that a fan could steal a photo of her in hospital

Sunday, Dec 15, 2019

DAILY MAIL – Emilia Clarke discussed her torment over suffering from a second brain aneurysm in a new interview with Wonderland Magazine, on Friday.

The Game Of Thrones star, 33, revealed her fear that someone would recognise her while she was at her most vulnerable and fighting for her life.

Of being treated in hospital, she said: ‘[With] the second one, I lost a lot of hope; I lost a lot of optimism. That’s insane bad luck.

But there I was in a f***ing American hospital with drains coming out of my head, fully swollen, full of all the drugs they give you, and all I could think was, “please don’t recognise me, please don’t recognise me, please don’t recognise me.”‘

While she accepted that working on a show as popular as Game Of Thrones meant she ‘signed up for’ attention from fans wherever she goes, she explained some of the struggles she had while out during the tough period of her life.

‘This is where you very quickly sound like a complete f***king d**k because we signed up for this, we asked for this, it’s part of the job,’ she explained.

‘And then you’re in a shopping centre with your mum who is crying over your recently dead dad and someone comes up and asks you for a picture and you say no and they’re like, “I expected better from you, I thought more of you than that.”‘

Describing the incident as ‘scary as all hell,’ Emilia admitted the headache caused by the aneurysm ‘is the worst pain you can possibly imagine.’

‘As I was throwing up I knew I was being brain damaged, but I didn’t know how I knew. And I was like, no, f*** this, not today, it’s not happening.

‘I was wiggling fingers and toes, thinking of lines from the season, trying to do everything I could to keep myself conscious because I could feel myself slipping into a coma.’

Emilia went on to say: ‘I do feel like the brain haemorrhages are the literal, physical embodiment of what it is to be attacked on a social media, because I didn’t want to look anyone in the eye, and I didn’t want anyone to recognise me.

‘I wanted to disappear completely, to wipe myself off the face of the earth, because I couldn’t handle the level of interaction. Because I felt totally laid bare, totally vulnerable, totally in pain.’

She then admitted that playing Daenerys Targaryen in the hit fantasy series helped her through the ‘many waves of stuff to chew over – the fame, the brain haemorrhages, my dad dying.’

‘For me, the show became my escape from all of it. If I was changing, I wasn’t really aware of it. All the change was done for me,’ she said positively. ‘Because she did it. Daenerys Stormborn, Mother of Dragons. F***ing Game of F***ing Thrones.’

Emilia spoke candidly about her health scares in March earlier this year, when she revealed she underwent two life-saving surgeries in the course of eight years to correct two different aneurysm growths.

The film star also credited her mum for being the ‘greatest support’ as she tried to recover from the ordeal while battling with aphasia [loss of speech].

She said: ‘There was also my mum, when she went into mum superpower in the hospital: I had aphasia [loss of speech], and she looked at me and went, ‘Yeah, I know exactly what you mean.’

‘She made me believe she understood exactly what I was saying. It was genuinely her greatest moment.’

Following her health battle, Emilia launched the charity SameYou, which helps raise money for people recovering from brain injuries and strokes.

She also became an ambassador for the Royal College of Nursing in 2018, after being met with ‘kind’ nurses during her time in hospital.

Read the full interview in Wonderland Magazine, which is available now.

Gallery: The Fashion Awards 2019

Wednesday, Dec 4, 2019

 

Gallery Links:

APPEARANCES > 2019 > Dec 2: The Fashion Awards 2019 – Red Carpet

APPEARANCES > 2019 > Dec 2: The Fashion Awards 2019 – Backstage

APPEARANCES > 2019 > Dec 2: The Fashion Awards 2019 – Show