Enchanting Emilia Clarke
 Mother of Dragons 
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Welcome to Enchanting Emilia Clarke, a fansite decided to the actress most known as Daenerys Targaryen from Game of Thrones since 2011. She has also stared in Terminator Genisys, Me Before You, Voice From the Stone, Solo: A Star Wars Story, and Last Christmas. Emilia's become one of Hollywood's A-listers as well as representing Dolce & Gabbana's The One perfume. That's not to mention being beloved by fans and celebrities internationally for her funny, quirky, humble, and genuine personality. She's truly Enchanting.
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June 11, 2021  AliKat No comments Interviews, Video

In EW’s exclusive look at theSkimm’s Texting With, the actress adds another suspect in the ongoing saga.

EW: After nearly two years, Emilia Clarke appears to be reigniting the mystery of who left a coffee cup in a scene from the final season of Game of Thrones.

While answering questions for theSkimm’s digital series, Texting With, Clarke, who played Daenerys Targaryen on the HBO series, addressed that infamous paper coffee cup that was spotted by eagle-eyed fans in front of the queen during a feast at Winterfell in “The Last of the Starks.”

Clarke brought up the subject herself when she found herself answering a question about her morning drink of choice during the Texting With episode, which EW has an exclusive look at below.

“It’s not Starbucks – spoiler,” she said. “I’m going to say it again for the record: was not mine. Looking at you Dan Weiss.”

Weiss, an executive producer of GoT alongside David Benioff, didn’t take credit for the hot beverage in an excerpt (via The Hollywood Reporter) from James Hibberd’s book, Fire Cannot Kill a Dragon.

“I’d seen that shot one thousand times, and we’re always looking at their faces or how the shot sat with the shots on either side of it,” Weiss said in the book. “I felt like we were the participants in a psychology experiment, like where you don’t see the gorillas running around in the background because you’re counting the basketballs. Every production that’s ever existed had things like this. You can see a crew member in Braveheart; there’s an actor wearing a wristwatch in Spartacus. But now people can rewind things and everybody is talking to each other in real time. So one person saw the coffee cup, rewound it, and then everybody did.”

With that said, previously, during a visit to NBC’s The Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon in Oct. 2019, Clarke actually singled out another cast mate instead – Conleth Hill, who played Lord Varys.

“Here’s the truth. We had like a party before the Emmys recently, and Conleth [Hill], kay? He plays Varys. He’s sitting next to me in that scene. He pulls me aside and he’s like, ‘Emilia, I’ve got to tell you something. I’ve got to tell you something, love. The coffee cup was mine.’ It was his. It was Conleth’s coffee cup. He said so,” she told Fallon.

Others, though, like Sophie Turner, who played Sansa Stark, visited Fallon and suggested it was Clarke’s.

No matter whose it was, the cup was quickly edited out of the scene, with HBO releasing a statement at the same time: “In response to inquiries from those who saw a craft services coffee cup in Sunday night’s episode of Game of Thrones… The latte that appeared in the episode was a mistake. Daenerys had ordered an herbal tea.”

Watch EW’s exclusive video from theSkimm to find out which storyline from GoT Clarke would’ve changed, and the Friends star she freaked out over after they commented on one of her Instagram posts.

TheSkimm’s Texting With Emilia Clarke debuts on theSkimm’s Instagram and at theskimm.com Thursday at 9 p.m. ET.

November 25, 2020  AliKat No comments Articles, Magazine Scans, Photoshoots, Video

BRITISH VOGUE – In a timely reminder that we not only need to celebrate this country’s unique theatre landscape, but to protect it, British Vogue gathered 10 of the London stage’s finest performers to find out what they love most about going to the theatre. From Jude Law to Emilia Clarke, Paapa Essiedu to Lily James, Sophie Okonedo to Andrew Scott, as well as Arinze Kene, Rosalie Craig, Sheila Atim and Indira Varma, find out how Britain’s starriest thespians learn their lines and the productions they regret missing out on.

 

October 12, 2020  AliKat No comments Articles, Video

SYFY – HBO’s Game of Thrones wasn’t your average fantasy epic. It was grim, dirty, violent, and sexual. In fact, it had such frequent and graphic nudity that it helped coin the phrase “sexposition” when referring to plot exposition being doled out by a nude character. But according to a new book, the experiences of the cast in these intimate scenes left plenty to be desired — especially in the hit show’s early, scrappy days.

James Hibberd’s new oral history Fire Cannot Kill a Dragon: Game of Thrones and the Official Untold Story of the Epic Series digs into this plenty, including interviews with everyone from Khal Drogo’s Jason Momoa to Cersei’s body double, Rebecca Van Cleave. Few were complementary to the series’ handling of its sex scenes, most of which took place long before HBO mandated hiring intimacy coordinators for all its shows in 2018.

Momoa took first-time showrunners D. B. Weiss and David Benioff’s unprofessional handling of the situations in stride, though he needed to sometimes refuse their requests. Momoa recalled a time while shooting a Season 1 sex scene when he placed the intimacy pouch (which covers an actor’s genitals in nude scenes) in Benioff’s hand: “That was because David had been like, ‘Momoa, just take it off!’ You know, giving me s***. ‘Sacrifice! Do it for your art!’ I’m just like, ‘F*** you, bro. My wife would be pissed. That’s for one lady only, man.'”

Momoa added: “So afterward I ripped the thing off and kept it in my hand and gave him a big hug and a handshake and was like, ‘Hey, now you have a little bit of me on you, buddy.'”

His scene partner, Daenerys Targaryen actress Emilia Clarke, has spoken at length about her uncomfortable experiences doing nudity on the show. “Because Jason had experience — he was an experienced actor who had done a bunch of stuff before coming on to this — he was like, ‘Sweetie, this is how it’s meant to be, this is how it’s not meant to be, and I’m going to make sure that that’s the f***ing gaze,’ Clarke said on the podcast Armchair Expert. “He was always like, ‘Can we get her a f***ing robe? She’s shivering!’ … He was so kind and considerate and cared about me as a human being.”

“I was so desperate to be the most professional actor I could be that I’d be like, ‘Yeah, sure,’ for anything they threw at me,” Clarke said in Fire Cannot Kill a Dragon. “I’ll just cry about it in the bathroom later, whatever, you won’t know.”

The actress, who appeared fully nude in sex scenes and when Daenerys is “reborn” in fire alongside her dragons, spoke about the pressures of being an actress fresh from drama school on that set. “Those were tough days,” she said of the first season, adding, “I’ve had fights on set before where I’m like, ‘No, the sheet stays up.’”

Misleading promises from production reportedly ranged from people sneaking onto a closed set to a supposedly closed set being thrown wide open. Hodor actor Kristian Nairn remembered during his Season 1 nude scene (“probably the most traumatic day of my life,” he previously said), when a prosthetic was worn because there was a child in the scene. Alas, things did not go as planned.

“I was s*** scared, but I did it because of the whole body-positive thing — Game of Thrones has a lot of people of different shapes and sizes, probably more than any other show ever,” Nairn said. “It was a very busy day on set, which was the opposite of what they told me. I’ve never seen a busier set!”

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October 02, 2020  AliKat No comments Interviews, SameYou, Video

TIME – Emilia Clarke—known for displaying strength as Daenerys Targaryen and exuding warmth in movies like Last Christmas and Me Before You—is no stranger to hospitals and healthcare workers. After suffering two brain aneurysms starting in 2011, her road to recovery brought her to a deep appreciation for the care she received during her journey back to health—and to want to enable others with brain injuries to find similar resources, the actor shared in a TIME100 Talks that aired on Sept. 24.

Clarke’s own experiences have provided her with what she called an “armor of sorts” to face the pandemic. “When you personally come very close to dying—which I did twice—it brings into light a conversation which you have with yourself which goes to the tune of: appreciation for the things you have in your life, thanks for the people who are here,” she said.

SameYou, Clarke’s brain injury recovery charity, attempts to help serve that purpose. But like many other organizations this year, SameYou has felt the challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“People with brain injuries were leaving hospital early,” she said. “My heart was bleeding for all the people who weren’t able to get what I was able to get.” Experimenting with new virtual ways to connect with brain injury patients has presented its own silver linings, however. “COVID has paradoxically been quite an incredible moment for us to really assess that properly and see: how are the ways, during a global pandemic, can we reach out and make people not feel alone?”

Clarke also discussed the “collective grief” she thinks we are all facing, and the empathy that it might engender. “What can come out of this is the knowledge that this stuff we place so much importance on the, the things, the materialistic things, take a backseat,” she said. “When you feel bad, when you feel low, when you feel sad, when you feel scared—I think there’s a societal setup for you to grab for more to fix it, to kind of cover it. When really what you need is to strip it back and be introspective and reflective where possible. That’s the thing that’s going to last you for the rest of your life.”

While Clarke’s on-camera work has been on hold, she’s stayed active reading poetry on her social media and participating in things like a theatrical table read of a play with her friend and colleague Emma Thompson, who also wrote her TIME100 tribute in 2019, with proceeds going to charity. And when it comes to returning to showbiz, Clarke—who has been vocal about the issues she faced on the Game of Thrones set—is optimistic about how the industry has changed. “There are [now] things like intimacy coaches, which is wonderful, and something that was very far away from my experience,” she said.

Lately, she’s particularly encouraged by movements toward representative storytelling. “Whose stories are we hearing? Who are we hearing? That’s vital. Inclusivity of humanity—of everybody—there’s not enough representation,” she said. “I believe it’s coming. That’s something I care about, and the way that audiences can support that is by watching things … and giving them big box office numbers. It’s a business.”

Expanding the breadth of stories we see on screen is good for everyone, she added: “The world will be richer for it.”

Clarke’s approach right now is earnest hope. “I just keep saying the cheesiest things, but I believe in humanity, I believe in us. It’s chilling that it takes a global pandemic to make a bunch of us stop and assess and see what we have. But I’m hopeful that our healthcare workers and our frontline workers are going to be supported forever,” she said. “I’m hopeful that in the wake of Black Lives Matter and everything that’s happened around that, we will continue to see stories from everyone. I’m hopeful that when we’re not fighting a virus that doesn’t care where you come from or how much money you have, we’ll still say, ‘Oh, we’re on the same side!’”






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