Welcome to Enchanting Emilia Clarke, a fansite decided to the actress best known as Daenerys Targaryen from Game of Thrones since 2011. She acted on stage in Breakfast at Tiffany's on Broadway, plus many movies, including Terminator Genisys, Me Before You, Solo: A Star Wars Story, and Last Christmas has some great upcoming projects. She'll be joining the MCU next year for Secret Invasions. Emilia has represented Dolce & Gabbana's and Clinque. That's not to mention being beloved by fans and celebrities internationally for her funny, quirky, humble, kind, and genuine personality. She's truly Enchanting.
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July 18 2022

VARIETY: Emilia Clarke has opened up about her experience surviving two brain aneurysms, expressing gratitude that she has been able to recover after losing “quite a bit” of the organ.

Clarke recalled her health troubles during an interview with the BBC’s Sunday Morning, in which she promoted her production of Anton Chekhov’s “The Seagull” at the Harold Pinter Theater. The play marks the actress’ West End debut.

“It was the most excruciating pain,” Clarke said. “It was incredibly helpful to have ‘Game of Thrones’ sweep me up and give me that purpose.”

Clarke suffered two life-threatening brain aneurysms while working on the HBO series: the first in 2011, the second in 2013. Both medical emergencies necessitated lengthy recovery periods. Clarke first opened up about the difficult situation in 2019, with the assurance that she is now completely better.

“The amount of my brain that is no longer usable — it’s remarkable that I am able to speak, sometimes articulately, and live my life completely normally with absolutely no repercussions,” Clarke stated. “I am in the really, really, really small minority of people that can survive that.”

Clarke then recalled the time she saw scans of her brain after the incidents.

“There’s quite a bit missing,” Clarke said before erupting into a big chuckle. “Which always makes me laugh… Strokes, basically, as soon as any part of your brain doesn’t get blood for a second, it’s gone. So the blood finds a different route to get around, but then whatever bit is missing is therefore gone.”

Clarke has since created a charity for brain injury and stroke victims called SameYou, though she has put her own medical troubles behind her and accepted her current health condition.

“I thought, ‘Well, this is who you are. This is the brain that you have.’ So there’s no point in continually wracking your brains about what might not be there,” Clarke said.

Clarke also took the time to discuss her role in “The Seagull,” which opened on July 6.

“The opportunity to play Nina in ‘The Seagull’ on the West End stage with a lauded, applauded incredible director like Jamie Lloyd — it’s been a kind of profound experience… It’s daring taking such a beloved and well-known play like this and putting it in such a modern, stripped-back, bare [format],” Clarke shared. “It’s why you do theater. It’s so exciting.”

July 13 2022

Ahead of her British stage debut in The Seagull, the Game of Thrones star talks about her self-doubt as the hit show took off, her decision to write about her brain aneurysms – and showing her love through baking

 

THE GUARDIAN: On 16 March 2020, Emilia Clarke went on stage with the cast of The Seagull. Previews had started, and the actor was about to make her much-anticipated West End debut after a decade starring in some of the biggest films and TV shows imaginable. At the half-hour mark, everything stopped: the government had decreed that theatres were to shut with immediate effect. Lost and adrift, everyone huddled into a pub, which was filled with crowds from the surrounding theatres. “My lawyer from America was calling about something,” recalls Clarke now. “And she was like, ‘Get out of the pub!’ We had no idea of the enormity of it.”

Events, of course, got in the way. Two-and-a-bit years on, we meet at The Seagull rehearsal studios in south London, a cavernous former warehouse with a skeletal stage set up in the middle of it. Not much is known about Jamie Lloyd’s production of the classic Chekhov play, but hopefully it isn’t too much of a spoiler to say – based on a diorama sitting on a side table – that it will feature some chairs. “There are no distractions,” says Clarke. “We don’t have a samovar. There’s no linen. There aren’t any trees. No one’s in crinoline. What we’re doing could be seen as quite radical. I think it might be Marmite.”

The actor is no stranger to the divisive power of art – on which more later – but the spare and lean production marks a pronounced change from the jobs she has done since being catapulted into superstardom by Game of Thrones in 2011. Following the phenomenally successful HBO series, in which she portrayed Daenerys Targaryen, Clarke has starred alongside Arnold Schwarzenegger in Terminator Genisys, played Han Solo’s love interest in Solo: A Star Wars Story and dressed as an elf in Paul Feig’s Emma Thompson-scripted romcom Last Christmas. She has won a Bafta Britannia award and been nominated for numerous Emmy, Screen Actors Guild and Critics’ Choice awards; in 2019, she was one of Time’s 100 most influential people.
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June 23 2021

June 11 2021

In EW’s exclusive look at theSkimm’s Texting With, the actress adds another suspect in the ongoing saga.

EW: After nearly two years, Emilia Clarke appears to be reigniting the mystery of who left a coffee cup in a scene from the final season of Game of Thrones.

While answering questions for theSkimm’s digital series, Texting With, Clarke, who played Daenerys Targaryen on the HBO series, addressed that infamous paper coffee cup that was spotted by eagle-eyed fans in front of the queen during a feast at Winterfell in “The Last of the Starks.”

Clarke brought up the subject herself when she found herself answering a question about her morning drink of choice during the Texting With episode, which EW has an exclusive look at below.

“It’s not Starbucks – spoiler,” she said. “I’m going to say it again for the record: was not mine. Looking at you Dan Weiss.”

Weiss, an executive producer of GoT alongside David Benioff, didn’t take credit for the hot beverage in an excerpt (via The Hollywood Reporter) from James Hibberd’s book, Fire Cannot Kill a Dragon.

“I’d seen that shot one thousand times, and we’re always looking at their faces or how the shot sat with the shots on either side of it,” Weiss said in the book. “I felt like we were the participants in a psychology experiment, like where you don’t see the gorillas running around in the background because you’re counting the basketballs. Every production that’s ever existed had things like this. You can see a crew member in Braveheart; there’s an actor wearing a wristwatch in Spartacus. But now people can rewind things and everybody is talking to each other in real time. So one person saw the coffee cup, rewound it, and then everybody did.”

With that said, previously, during a visit to NBC’s The Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon in Oct. 2019, Clarke actually singled out another cast mate instead – Conleth Hill, who played Lord Varys.

“Here’s the truth. We had like a party before the Emmys recently, and Conleth [Hill], kay? He plays Varys. He’s sitting next to me in that scene. He pulls me aside and he’s like, ‘Emilia, I’ve got to tell you something. I’ve got to tell you something, love. The coffee cup was mine.’ It was his. It was Conleth’s coffee cup. He said so,” she told Fallon.

Others, though, like Sophie Turner, who played Sansa Stark, visited Fallon and suggested it was Clarke’s.

No matter whose it was, the cup was quickly edited out of the scene, with HBO releasing a statement at the same time: “In response to inquiries from those who saw a craft services coffee cup in Sunday night’s episode of Game of Thrones… The latte that appeared in the episode was a mistake. Daenerys had ordered an herbal tea.”

Watch EW’s exclusive video from theSkimm to find out which storyline from GoT Clarke would’ve changed, and the Friends star she freaked out over after they commented on one of her Instagram posts.

TheSkimm’s Texting With Emilia Clarke debuts on theSkimm’s Instagram and at theskimm.com Thursday at 9 p.m. ET.

November 25 2020

VOGUE – Since 2015, Chanel and Tribeca Enterprises (founded by Robert De Niro and Jane Rosenthal) have selected young, female and/or nonbinary filmmakers to participate in their joint mentorship fund competition Through Her Lens. The candidates, a group of about 10, get paired up with mentors—experts in script-to-screen development, casting, music composition, costume design, producing, and directing—and because Chanel is involved, the group is always top-notch, made up of the discerning sorts of figures you might expect to see sitting front row. They include Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Diane Kruger, Julianne Moore, Katie Holmes, Sarah Jessica Parker, and Kathryn Bigelow; while the likes of A.V. Rockwell, Nikyatu Jusu, and Hannah Peterson have competed, going on to screen their work at Sundance, the Toronto International Film Festival, and the BlackStar Film Festival.

In years past, Through Her Lens has kicked off with a luncheon, usually at De Niro’s Locanda Verde in New York, that unfolds like a parade of Chanel-clad film-industry talents. In the three days that follow, participants get one-on-one mentoring sessions and master classes dedicated to the development of short film projects. The program culminates with a lucky three being awarded grant money to help realize their films. This year, there will be no tweedy lunch or face-to-face mentorship sessions, but Chanel and Tribeca Enterprises are committed to continuing the program 2020 style: virtually.

Ahead of this year’s lineup, we caught up with Emilia Clarke, who will serve as mentors alongside Glenn Close, Niki Caro, Lucy Boynton, and Uzo Aduba. Calling her involvement “an absolute no-brainer,” the former Game of Thrones star rang from London, and her firecracker enthusiasm could be felt through the transatlantic call. She’s been at home for much of 2020, which has allowed her the time to develop projects for her own production company and to work with her charity, Same You, dedicated to brain injury recovery. Through Her Lens is just another chance for Clarke to give back. Below, she stresses the value of mentorship, the need to know your references and the glorious benefits of binge-watching cinema.

How did you first hear about Through Her Lens?

I got a call from my rep telling me about Through Her Lens. As soon as I heard about it, I was like, “Damn straight. I am so in!” I did a judging panel for the BFI last year and it was so fulfilling and amazing. I really passionately care about new voices being heard, especially when those voices are female, so this was an absolute no-brainer. It’s kind of funny because you’re sort of like, well, what can I bring to the table? What experiences can I share that might be beneficial to someone coming into the industry? Because Lord knows I would have loved [a mentor] for myself! I think that when you’re a female in this industry, you do have a slightly singular experience. And I think that it’s becoming increasingly valuable for us women to talk to each other.

What experiences and advice will you share with your mentees?

An understanding of what I’ve learned and what to expect; what you can push back on and what the environment you are being sent into is like. Because everybody starts with, largely speaking, a wide-eyed, optimistic gaze, and I think that the best way to have your stories told and heard is by understanding the environment you’re walking into. And now, as a producer as well, I see a whole other side of things, which is teaching me a lot as an actor and will definitely be valuable to a young filmmaker or a new voice.

You mentioned you wished you had more of a mentor. Could you expand on that?
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