Welcome to Enchanting Emilia Clarke, a fansite decided to the actress best known as Daenerys Targaryen from Game of Thrones since 2011. She acted on stage in Breakfast at Tiffany's on Broadway, plus many movies, including Terminator Genisys, Me Before You, Solo: A Star Wars Story, and Last Christmas has some great upcoming projects. She'll be joining the MCU next year for Secret Invasions. Emilia has represented Dolce & Gabbana's and Clinque. That's not to mention being beloved by fans and celebrities internationally for her funny, quirky, humble, kind, and genuine personality. She's truly Enchanting.
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July 18 2022

VARIETY: Emilia Clarke has opened up about her experience surviving two brain aneurysms, expressing gratitude that she has been able to recover after losing “quite a bit” of the organ.

Clarke recalled her health troubles during an interview with the BBC’s Sunday Morning, in which she promoted her production of Anton Chekhov’s “The Seagull” at the Harold Pinter Theater. The play marks the actress’ West End debut.

“It was the most excruciating pain,” Clarke said. “It was incredibly helpful to have ‘Game of Thrones’ sweep me up and give me that purpose.”

Clarke suffered two life-threatening brain aneurysms while working on the HBO series: the first in 2011, the second in 2013. Both medical emergencies necessitated lengthy recovery periods. Clarke first opened up about the difficult situation in 2019, with the assurance that she is now completely better.

“The amount of my brain that is no longer usable — it’s remarkable that I am able to speak, sometimes articulately, and live my life completely normally with absolutely no repercussions,” Clarke stated. “I am in the really, really, really small minority of people that can survive that.”

Clarke then recalled the time she saw scans of her brain after the incidents.

“There’s quite a bit missing,” Clarke said before erupting into a big chuckle. “Which always makes me laugh… Strokes, basically, as soon as any part of your brain doesn’t get blood for a second, it’s gone. So the blood finds a different route to get around, but then whatever bit is missing is therefore gone.”

Clarke has since created a charity for brain injury and stroke victims called SameYou, though she has put her own medical troubles behind her and accepted her current health condition.

“I thought, ‘Well, this is who you are. This is the brain that you have.’ So there’s no point in continually wracking your brains about what might not be there,” Clarke said.

Clarke also took the time to discuss her role in “The Seagull,” which opened on July 6.

“The opportunity to play Nina in ‘The Seagull’ on the West End stage with a lauded, applauded incredible director like Jamie Lloyd — it’s been a kind of profound experience… It’s daring taking such a beloved and well-known play like this and putting it in such a modern, stripped-back, bare [format],” Clarke shared. “It’s why you do theater. It’s so exciting.”

July 13 2022

July 13 2022

Ahead of her British stage debut in The Seagull, the Game of Thrones star talks about her self-doubt as the hit show took off, her decision to write about her brain aneurysms – and showing her love through baking

 

THE GUARDIAN: On 16 March 2020, Emilia Clarke went on stage with the cast of The Seagull. Previews had started, and the actor was about to make her much-anticipated West End debut after a decade starring in some of the biggest films and TV shows imaginable. At the half-hour mark, everything stopped: the government had decreed that theatres were to shut with immediate effect. Lost and adrift, everyone huddled into a pub, which was filled with crowds from the surrounding theatres. “My lawyer from America was calling about something,” recalls Clarke now. “And she was like, ‘Get out of the pub!’ We had no idea of the enormity of it.”

Events, of course, got in the way. Two-and-a-bit years on, we meet at The Seagull rehearsal studios in south London, a cavernous former warehouse with a skeletal stage set up in the middle of it. Not much is known about Jamie Lloyd’s production of the classic Chekhov play, but hopefully it isn’t too much of a spoiler to say – based on a diorama sitting on a side table – that it will feature some chairs. “There are no distractions,” says Clarke. “We don’t have a samovar. There’s no linen. There aren’t any trees. No one’s in crinoline. What we’re doing could be seen as quite radical. I think it might be Marmite.”

The actor is no stranger to the divisive power of art – on which more later – but the spare and lean production marks a pronounced change from the jobs she has done since being catapulted into superstardom by Game of Thrones in 2011. Following the phenomenally successful HBO series, in which she portrayed Daenerys Targaryen, Clarke has starred alongside Arnold Schwarzenegger in Terminator Genisys, played Han Solo’s love interest in Solo: A Star Wars Story and dressed as an elf in Paul Feig’s Emma Thompson-scripted romcom Last Christmas. She has won a Bafta Britannia award and been nominated for numerous Emmy, Screen Actors Guild and Critics’ Choice awards; in 2019, she was one of Time’s 100 most influential people.
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June 23 2022

BBC: She is best known for playing the fearless Daenerys Targaryen, Mother of Dragons, in Game of Thrones. But Emilia Clarke says she is “petrified” ahead of her UK stage debut in Chekhov’s The Seagull.

“I’m profoundly aware of the fact that there will be people who love Game of Thrones and are seeing it for that,” she tells the BBC.

“It’s 10 times more frightening because there’ll be people wanting to go and say, ‘Well she can only act on camera, she clearly can’t act on stage,’ which is obviously the biggest fear.”

But the British actress also hopes that by appearing in a play written in 1895, about a group of lonely Russians living on an isolated country estate, she will encourage a different audience to go to the theatre.

“Hopefully they’ll come and go, ‘We just came to see the Mother of Dragons, oh how frustrating, she’s not on a dragon, this isn’t what I paid for.’ Spoiler: I’m not on a dragon at any point during this play,” she laughs.

“But hopefully what they get, as a kind of little extra, is that they get to enjoy this play that they might not have seen otherwise.”

Clarke plays Nina opposite co-star Tom Rhys Harries, who portrays Trigorin.

But there is another layer of anxiety. After a frantic decade in which Clarke became a global superstar, had two brain haemorrhages and lost her beloved father to cancer, finally appearing in the West End is daunting because “it’s something I’ve wanted for so long”.

“It’s frightening because it’s a dream of mine finally realised,” she says.

All the more so because the production was due to open in March 2020, but closed after just four preview performances when the pandemic shut theatres.

“There is no higher art than theatre,” says the 35-year-old. “I adore it. I absolutely love it. I feel happiest, safest, most at home.”

Which might seem odd for an actress who has appeared on stage professionally only once before, in Breakfast at Tiffany’s on Broadway in 2013. It did not go well, with Ben Brantley in The New York Times describing her performance as the glamorous Holly Golightly as “an under-age debutante trying very, very hard to pass for a sophisticated grown-up”.

Meanwhile, David Rooney in The Hollywood Reporter criticised the “miscasting” of Clarke, writing: “There’s neither softness nor fragility in her grating Holly.”

It was a “catastrophic failure”, Clarke cheerfully tells me.

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October 29 2021

What’s On Stage: The Seagull with Emilia Clarke has announced new plans for its West End run.

The piece, adapted from Chekhov by Anya Reiss, had to close in previews last March but is now back for a full run. It follows a group of characters, all based at an isolated house in the country, that console each other as their dreams fall apart.

The piece will star Emilia Clarke (Nina), Tom Rhys Harries (Trigorin), Daniel Monks (Konstantin), Indira Varma (Arkadina) and Sophie Wu (Masha), with Katie Buchholz, Tina Harris and Joseph Langdon. Further cast to be announced.

The show opens at the Harold Pinter Theatre on 6 July, with previews from 29 June, running until 10 September 2022.

Jamie Lloyd directs, with design by Soutra Gilmour, lighting design by Jackie Shemesh, composition and sound design by George Dennis, projection design by Duncan McLean, associate direction by Jonathan Glew, casting direction by Stuart Burt, costume supervision by Anna Josephs and props supervision by Fahmida Bakht.

The news comes as Cyrano de Bergerac also confirms a return to UK stages. Lloyd said today, “It is incredibly exciting to confirm the return of these productions and, most importantly, the continuation of our access ticket schemes, with 12,000 £15 seats across the productions and 5000 totally free tickets, which will enable people with limited access to the theatre to experience our work — an important commitment as our industry builds back.

“Alongside our brilliant Emerge participants, we’re thrilled to be welcoming more adventurous artists into the company with the announcement of our new Associate Artists and our writers under commission, who will create bold, radical reappraisals of some iconic international plays. Together, they represent the most exciting and innovative talent working in British theatre today.”

For both Cyrano de Bergerac and The Seagull, 12,000 tickets will priced at £15 across all UK productions, with 75% specifically for under 30s, key workers and those receiving government benefits.

In addition, The Seagull will offer 5,000 free tickets for those with limited access to the arts.

The Jamie Lloyd Company has also announced that Zawe Ashton, Soutra Gilmour, Mika Onyx Johnson and Nima Taleghani will be associate artists, while Jade Anouka, Rachel De-lahay, Reiss and Taleghani have been announced as writers under commission.