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Welcome to Enchanting Emilia Clarke, formerly Emilia Clarke Central (2012-2016), a fansite decided to the actress most known as Daenerys Targaryen from Game of Thrones since 2011. She has also stared in Terminator Genisys, Me Before You, Voice From the Stone, and Solo: A Star Wars Story. Emilia's become one of Hollywood's A-listers as well as representing Dolce & Gabbana's The One perfume. That's not to mention being beloved by fans and celebrities internationally for her funny, quirky, humble, and genuine personality. She's truly Enchanting.
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Just when all my childhood dreams seemed to have come true, I nearly lost my mind and then my life. I’ve never told this story publicly, but now it’s time.

It was the beginning of 2011. I had just finished filming the first season of “Game of Thrones,” a new HBO series based on George R. R. Martin’s “A Song of Ice and Fire” novels. With almost no professional experience behind me, I’d been given the role of Daenerys Targaryen, also known as Khaleesi of the Great Grass Sea, Lady of Dragonstone, Breaker of Chains, Mother of Dragons. As a young princess, Daenerys is sold in marriage to a musclebound Dothraki warlord named Khal Drogo. It’s a long story—eight seasons long—but suffice to say that she grows in stature and in strength. She becomes a figure of power and self-possession. Before long, young girls would dress in platinum wigs and flowing robes to be Daenerys Targaryen for Halloween.

The show’s creators, David Benioff and D. B. Weiss, have said that my character is a blend of Napoleon, Joan of Arc, and Lawrence of Arabia. And yet, in the weeks after we finished shooting the first season, despite all the looming excitement of a publicity campaign and the series première, I hardly felt like a conquering spirit. I was terrified. Terrified of the attention, terrified of a business I barely understood, terrified of trying to make good on the faith that the creators of “Thrones” had put in me. I felt, in every way, exposed. In the very first episode, I appeared naked, and, from that first press junket onward, I always got the same question: some variation of “You play such a strong woman, and yet you take off your clothes. Why?” In my head, I’d respond, “How many men do I need to kill to prove myself?”

To relieve the stress, I worked out with a trainer. I was a television actor now, after all, and that is what television actors do. We work out. On the morning of February 11, 2011, I was getting dressed in the locker room of a gym in Crouch End, North London, when I started to feel a bad headache coming on. I was so fatigued that I could barely put on my sneakers. When I started my workout, I had to force myself through the first few exercises.

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Spend any time with Emilia Clarke, and it’s easy to see that she’s not like the character she plays on TV. “The big difference between me and Dani [is] my sense of humor, in that I have one,” Clarke laughed. “I mean, that lady ain’t cracking jokes!”
“That lady” is Daenerys Stormborn of House Targaryen, rightful heir to the Iron Throne, rightful Queen of the Andals and the First Men, Khaleesi of the Great Grass Sea, and Protector of the Seven Kingdoms, among other titles. She commands an air force of dragons, walks through fire, and is a serious contender to win the “Game of Thrones.”

The final season of the series, which begins next week on HBO, is the biggest TV show on Earth. It’s famous for killing off its lead characters, but (so far) Clarke’s has survived.
Correspondent Tracy Smith said, “Even though you are one of the obviously most powerful characters in the show, I don’t think audiences would be surprised if they killed you?”
“Well, this is the incredible writing, the incredible storytelling on the show,” Clarke said. “And in that way that life can be shocking and frightening and confusing, this show doesn’t shy away from that for the sake of storytelling. It embraces that.”
“So, without giving anything away, when you read that final script, what happens to Daenerys, what was your reaction?”
“It’s sort of almost impossible to answer that question.”
“Without giving something away?”
“Uh-huh. I have so much to say about that!”
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Gallery link: Photos taken from Far Far Away

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EW – OCTOBER 2017: THE TABLE READ

When Kit Harington entered the conference room, he had no idea what to expect.

The final season’s scripts had been emailed just a couple of days earlier, sending the Game of Thrones cast into a reading frenzy. Like millions of fans around the world, the actors had been waiting nearly a decade to learn their characters’ fates. The entire six-episode season arrived at once, protected by layers of password security.

Sophie Turner flew through her copies in record time, quickly messaging the producers her reaction. “It was completely overwhelming,” says the actress, who plays Sansa Stark. “Afterwards I felt numb, and I had to take a walk for hours.” Others, like Emilia Clarke (Daenerys Targaryen), first had to hurry home to get some privacy. “I turned to my best mate and was like, ‘Oh my God! I gotta go! I gotta go!’” she recalls. “And I completely flipped out.” She then settled in for a reading session with a cup of tea. “Genuinely the effect it had on me was profound,” Clarke adds. “That sounds insanely pretentious, but I’m an actor, so I’m allowed one pretentious adjective per season.” Peter Dinklage, meanwhile, broke his years-long habit of checking immediately to see if Tyrion Lannister survives. “This was the first time ever that I didn’t skip to the end,” he says.

Even showrunners David Benioff and Dan Weiss were uncharacteristically anxious, wondering how the actors would react to the climactic twists. “We knew exactly when our script coordinator sent them out, we knew what minute they sent them, and then you’re just waiting for the emails,” Benioff said.

The cast then journeyed to Belfast to gather in a production office for the formal read-through. By then, everybody knew the tale that was about to unfold, with two notable exceptions: Davos Seaworth actor Liam Cunningham (“The f—ing scripts wouldn’t open, the double extra security!” he grouses) and Harington, who outright refused to read anything in advance.

“I walked in saying, ‘Don’t tell me, I don’t want to know,’” Harington says. “What’s the point of reading it to myself in my own head when I can listen to people do it and find out with my friends?” So, yes: Jon Snow, quite literally, knew nothing.

Benioff and Weiss opened the proceedings by asking the cast to refrain from doing anything during filming or afterward that might reveal even the tiniest spoiler (“Don’t even take a photo of your boots on the ground of the set,” one actor recalls being told). And then, seated around a long table scattered with a few prop skulls, the cast read aloud the final season of Game of Thrones.

At one point, Harington wept.

Later, he cried a second time.

 

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EW – Daenerys Targaryen and Jon Snow return on this week’s cover of Entertainment Weekly.

In the latest issue, we go behind the scenes of Game of Thrones, the most secretive series on television, for the HBO epic’s final season.

From an emotional table read to staging the show’s biggest battle yet to a preview of the season 8’s mysterious storyline, the new issue is an exclusive first look at the show’s six remaining episodes from the set in Northern Ireland.

“It’s about all of these disparate characters coming together to face a common enemy, dealing with their own past, and defining the person they want to be in the face of certain death,” co-executive producer Bryan Cogman says. “It’s an incredibly emotional haunting bittersweet final season and I think it honors very much what [author George R.R. Martin] set out to do — which is flipping this kind of story on its head.”

On the cover, Emilia Clarke and Kit Harington embrace — tellingly, in the snow — in the first official photo from the set of the final season. The actors endured a grueling 10-month shoot to create just six episodes amid the cast and crew’s obsession to make every detail of the final hours as excellent as possible.

“It’s relentless; scenes that would have been a one-day shoot five years ago are now a five-day shoot,” Harington says. “They want to get it right, they want to shoot everything every single way so they have options.”

Agrees Clarke: “[Camera] checks take longer, costumes are a bit better, hair and makeup a bit sharper — every choice, every conversation, every attitude, has this air of ‘this is it.’ Everything feels more intense.”