Enchanting Emilia Clarke
 Mother of Dragons 
Welcome Message
Welcome to Enchanting Emilia Clarke, a fansite decided to the actress most known as Daenerys Targaryen from Game of Thrones since 2011. She has also stared in Terminator Genisys, Me Before You, Voice From the Stone, Solo: A Star Wars Story, and Last Christmas. Emilia's become one of Hollywood's A-listers as well as representing Dolce & Gabbana's The One perfume. That's not to mention being beloved by fans and celebrities internationally for her funny, quirky, humble, and genuine personality. She's truly Enchanting.
Recent News
Spotlight On

May 22, 2018  AliKat No comments Appearances, Interviews, Video

 

 

 

Gallery Links:

 

 

 

EW – We had a lot of questions for Alden Ehrenreich when he showed up alongside stars Donald Glover, Emilia Clarke, and Paul Bettany for a Solo: A Star Wars Story Town Hall that will air on SiriusXM’s Entertainment Weekly Radio (channel 105) on Thursday, May 24 at 6 p.m. But there was one question that mattered above all others: Who shot first?

 

We asked it simple and we asked it plain: Who shot first in Star Wars: A New Hope — Han Solo or Greedo? In the original 1977 theatrical run, it was Han who fired the first lethal blow while sitting across from the Rodian bounty hunter in the Tatooine Cantina.

 

When the Special Edition of the film came out in 1997, however, Han’s shot was only in response to a prior blast from Greedo (who also simultaneously displayed what can only be considered the worst aim in history). Then, it was changed again later with the two seeming to fire simultaneously (with Greedo maintaining his terrible aim).

 

“Han Shot First” has become a rallying cry for Star Wars fans who feel the change drastically altered what made the scoundrel Han Solo so appealing in the first place. So we asked the man who now plays him for his thoughts on the controversy. Sooooooo, who shot first?

Continue reading  »

VARIETY – Solo: A Star Wars Story” was the rare Hollywood blockbuster that changed directors in mid-shoot.

 

With hundreds of millions of dollars on the line, the filmmakers shuffle could have doomed the picture and resulted in lots of bad blood on the set. However, in an interview at the Cannes Film Festival on Tuesday, where “Solo: A Star Wars Story” is about to screen, Emilia Clarke said that the shift from directors Chris Lord and Phil Miller to Ron Howard was “seamless.”

 

Howard, the Oscar-winning director of “A Beautiful Mind,” had no time to prep, Clarke said, but on his first day he immediately earned the trust of his cast and crew.

 

“He took us all in and listened to everyone,” said Clarke, adding, “He took us from this kind of ‘what are we doing’ to a place of such ease and comfort and fun.”

 

During an hour-long talk as part of the Kering Women in Motion talks, Clarke didn’t say what happened to lead to Lord and Miller’s firing, but the duo’s improvisation-heavy style was reportedly alienating some actors and led to clashes with LucasFilm head Kathleen Kennedy. She did allude to substantial re-shoots, saying that her response when she’d revisit certain scenes was, “Yes, thank goodness. I did not do that well.”

 

Although deathly afraid of “Solo” spoilers (she gripped the sides of her chair when asked), Clarke did tease that takes place in “a part of Star Wars that we have not spent a huge amount of time in before: the dark, shady, gangster underworld.”

 

Clarke flew to Cannes in the midst of shooting the final season of HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” the fantasy epic series that features her playing the steel-willed Daenerys Targaryen. She confessed that she’s not certain how all the palace intrigue and clashes for the Iron Throne will end.

Continue reading  »


 

EW – Game of Thrones fans know her as Daenerys Stormborn of House Targaryen, rightful heir to the Iron Throne, rightful Queen of the Andals and the First Men, Protector of the Seven Kingdoms, the Mother of Dragons, the Khaleesi of the Great Grass Sea, the Unburnt, the Breaker of Chains.

 

Star Wars fans will come to know Emilia Clarke only as: Qi’ra.

 

This is a character who doesn’t want her full resume out there. She’s a woman of shadows, of secrecy. She’s a woman of many identities, the truest ones hidden away and only visible to those she trusts, which may be no one.

 

She’s also one of the primary forces that shape the young smuggler we meet in Solo: A Star Wars Story.

 

As part of Entertainment Weekly’s cover story about the May 25 movie, we caught up with Clarke to discuss what we need to know about this galactic femme fatale.

 

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Are you currently shooting the final season of Game of Thrones?

 

EMILIA CLARKE: Technically I am currently shooting Game of Thrones. But right now I am in Rome shooting a D&G campaign. So sort of a mixture of the two.

 

Sounds like a busy time, so thanks for talking to me about Qi’ra. She and Han Solo go back to their childhoods, so can you characterize the setup of their relationship?

 

Well, they grew up as comrades, essentially. They grew up as pals, as partners in crime. There is obviously the romantic side of things. But they grew up together. So they were kids together. And the beautiful thing about this Han Solo story is it’s highlighting all of the most brilliant aspects of Han Solo the character and characterizing those aspects in characters that he meets on his journey to becoming who he is.

 

These people all represent different sides of who he becomes?

 

That’s kind of the story, really. You are seeing all of these different elements that make up who he is through the people and the interactions and the relationships just as we all do as human beings. We are simply the embodiment of our experiences, essentially.

 

They’re guiding him, inspiring him. Maybe corrupting him?

 

You see the beginnings of him, this loveable rogue. You get it fine-tuned throughout these relationships, and Qi’ra is one of those relationships that has an impact on him as a character. I mean, hopefully [laughs] — if I have done my job. And within that relationship, the thing that that you see with Qi’ra is that she an enigma.

 

So through her, he learns not to show his cards to people.

 

She is a little bit of a tough one to get a hold of, really. There is this underlying joy in an origin story because you know where they end up. And Qi’ra is nowhere to be seen, so … something has happened! [Laughs] You know what I mean?

 

The film will give us a reason why he doesn’t talk about her?
Continue reading  »

THE TELEGRAPH – Emilia Clarke walks into a suite at Claridge’s, a gaggle of publicists and agents surrounding her, with the kind of poise that you would expect from a queen.

 

To the tens of millions of fans of Game of Thrones, the show that catapulted her to fame only a year out of drama school, it’s a not unfamiliar scene.

 

Although of course, as Daenerys Targaryen, the all-powerful, slave-freeing queen of the show, it would be some kind of windswept castle or ancient pyramid, and her retinue would be in armour.

 

Even her newly blonde hair is apt (until now she’s worn a wig on the show). Like the character she plays, Emilia’s is a story of success against the odds (of which more later), but there the similarities end.

 

At 31, the English rose couldn’t be less like the prickly queen she plays (full title: Daenerys Stormborn of House Targaryen, rightful heir to the Iron Throne, rightful Queen of the Andals and the First Men, Protector of the Seven Kingdoms, the Mother of Dragons, the Khaleesi of the Great Grass Sea, the Unburnt, the Breaker of Chains… or just Dany for short).

 

Emilia is funny, light-hearted and, that entrance aside, a million miles from grand. She’s much more like the carefree, dancing girl she plays in the new campaign for the Dolce & Gabbana fragrance The One. (When the brand asked if she would be its new face, ‘I was like, “Well, yeah. Duh.”’)

 

In the past, Emilia has had to deal with uncomfortable questions about how she, as a woman, justified the arguably gratuitous female nudity and gruesome violence for which Game of Thrones initially made headlines.

 

But long before the Harvey Weinstein scandal turned Hollywood upside down, the show’s plot pulled a complete 180 – and now it’s the female characters who are fighting over the titular thrones. And everyone, but everyone, is rooting for the 5ft 2in Khaleesi, who is proving to be just as fierce as her dragons.

Continue reading  »

November 21, 2017  AliKat No comments Gallery, Interviews, Photoshoots

 

Harper’s Bazaar: The ‘Game of Thrones’ star stuns as BAZAAR’s December/January covergirl.

 

“It’s this epic story: My grandmother was colonial Indian, and it was a big old family secret because her mum had an affair with someone in India,” says the English rose Emilia Clarke. “She would wear makeup to make her skin look white.” Granny passed away when Clarke was 16, and the teenager took off for India with her boyfriend to scatter the ashes. “She loved India more than she loved England,” Clarke says. “Fuck, yeah. I love that part of me—I’m like one-eighth Indian.”

 

Nationality is a fluid concept for the actress who speaks the fictional Dothraki language in Game of Thrones, played the flighty New Yorker Holly Golightly in Broadway’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and broke hearts as the working-class Brit Louisa in Me Before You. And now Dolce & Gabbana has her speaking Italian as the new face of its fragrance the One. Her first ad campaign for the house captures Clarke returning home to her imaginary Neapolitan family and enough pasta to feed a Targaryen army. And, mamma mia, does she love Italians. “People in Italy let you know how they feel,” she says. “I like that I don’t need to guess. There’s something so addictive about their personalities.”

Continue reading  »






Emilia-Clarke.com is an unofficial non-profit fansite dedicated to Emilia Clarke in hopes to help promote her talent and career. This site has no official affiliation with Emilia Clarke or her agents - it is run by fans for fans. The webmaster(s) of this website claim no ownership to any material seen on this website and is used, to the best of their knowledge, under the "Fair Use" copyright laws.